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LASIK is All in the Family

LASIK is all in the family for brothers Andy & Gary, who both had LASIK with Dr. Moran on the same day!
We had to capture the moment, because it was a first for Dr. Moran. Although he has done LASIK on members of the same family, it was the first time in 20 years that he had a set of brothers together on the same surgery schedule.  

The brothers with their favorite LASIK Surgeon

Older brother Andy scheduled a free LASIK consult to see if he was a candidate for LASIK. He provided the inspiration for his brother Gary to make an appointment to see if LASIK was right for him.  Although the brothers had different prescriptions, they both were excellent candidates. So it made sense for Andy to go first, Gary followed twenty minutes later!
 
This pic was taken just moments after older brother Andy’s LASIK procedure, and minutes before Gary’s turn in the Laser Suite with Dr. Moran.  Everyone is smiling…and Gary doesn’t need those glasses any more!
Call our office for your LASIK consult, and bring your brother, sister, cousin, mom or dad!  Spend some quality time together, and find out if LASIK is right for your family!

You should not wear perfume to your LASIK procedure

Perfume particles in airThere is a lot to think about before getting LASIK surgery, and smelling nice isn’t usually at the top of the list. Smell and sight are too different senses right? What does one have to do with the other? Well here’s why as part of your pre-op LASIK instructions you will be told not to wear perfume or cologne.

LASIK surgery is a very precise and controlled surgery. While we can’t control how your eye will respond to the treatment, we can make accurate predictions. We can control how the laser is programmed and how the treatment is delivered. And we do control those things very precisely. We deal in microns. A micron is a millionth of a meter. To give you an idea of the size of micron, your hair is about 50 microns. And anything smaller than 40 microns you can’t even see.

While we can’t control your eye’s response,  we can and do control other things. The air the laser passes through before it treats your eye is a factor. We monitor the temperature of the air, the humidity in the air and the purity of the air. The laser only passes about 12 inches through this air. But the laser we use is a short wavelength laser.  The laser “fixes” or treats the first thing it comes in contact with. It doesn’t penetrate substances well. When we calibrate our laser and design our treatment we take this passage through air into account.

Because the smells are actually particles in the air, perfume can change this air. If everyone wore exactly the same perfume and the same amount we could account for this in our treatment. But that’s impractical and it’s best to have just “clean” air which we have calibrated for.

Skipping the perfume the day of the surgery allows for a more accurate treatment and more predictable results. Enjoy some of the cleanest air you’ve every smelled during your surgery and save the perfume for after surgery.

LASIK Myths & Facts

 

Surfer’s Eye

There is an eye condition called “Surfer’s Eye”.  Can you guess how it got its name?

surfing large

 

It’s not about the water…but If you thought it had to do with too much sun exposure, you would be right!

Long-term exposure to UV rays from the sun, as well as wind and dust, may result in growths on the surface of the eye.  Surfers are particularly vulnerable, since they spend their time in the sun without sunglasses or other eye protection.

The technical term for growths on the eye caused by sun exposure are called Pinguecula and Pterygium.  The condition appears on the eye’s conjuctiva (the clear covering over the white part of the eye.

pinguecula surfers eyePinguecula is a yellowish, raised growth on the conjunctiva. It’s usually on the side of the eye near your nose, but can happen on the other side too. A pinguecula is an abnormality formed by protein deposits, calcium or fat. It’s like a callus on your finger or toe.

 

Pterygium surfers eye

Pterygium (Surfer’s Eye) is a growth of fleshy tissue (has blood vessels). It usually has a triangular shape.  It can remain small or grow large enough to cover part of the cornea.  When it grows into the cornea, it can interfere with your vision.

Symptoms

The symptoms of pinguecula and pterygium can range from mild to severe. They include:

  • redness and swelling of the conjunctiva
  • a yellow spot or bump that builds on the white of your eye
  • dryness, itching and burning in the eye.
  • sensation of something in the eye

    Treatment

  • The best treatment is prevention…keep your eyes lubricated with artificial tears and wear sunglasses with UV protection.
  • If you have the condition, lubricating eye drops will help to reduce discomfort.
  • Your doctor can prescribe steroid eye drops which may reduce inflammation, redness and swelling in the eye.
  • Surgical Removal:  If eye drops alone don’t alleviate the symptoms, or if the growth is large enough to interfere with your vision, the growth can be removed surgically.

Protect your eyes, protect your vision.  If you have any questions about caring for your sight, email, call or text our office.  We are here to help!

 

 

What is an Astigmatism?

Do you have an astigmatism?

The word might sound scary, but an astigmatism is nothing to be afraid of!  It is a common vision condition which most commonly occurs when the cornea (the clear front cover of the eye) is irregularly shaped.

If you have an astigmatism, the curve of your cornea is shaped more like a football, instead of round like a basketball.  This irregular curvature causes vision to be blurry, because your eye cannot focus light to a single sharp point on the retina.  Instead, light hits the retina in multiple places, so images are blurred.

You may have been born with astigmatism.  You could have inherited it from your parents.   It can decrease or increase over time. Astigmatism often occurs along with with nearsightedness, or farsightedness.

How is astigmatism measured?

Astigmatism refraction

Testing for astigmatism may may include:

  • Visual acuity-When you read letters on a distance chart, you are measuring your visual acuity. The result is given in two numbers, like 20/40.  The first number is the number of feet from the eye chart. The bottom number shows the smallest size line you can read.  If you have 20/40 vision, you would have to be within 20 feet of the chart to see what someone with normal vision could see at 40 feet.
  • Topography– This device measures the topography of the surface of the cornea.  As you might guess, this measurement is important for a good fit for contact lenses.
  • Refraction– You might know this as the “Better 1 or Better 2 test”.  While you look through an instrument called a phoropter, we rotate through a series of lenses.  Based on your answers, the power is then refined to determine the lenses for the clearest vision. This power can be determined with machines but patient input remains integral in determining vision needs.

How is Astigmatism Corrected?

A comprehensive eye exam will measure the correction or power needed for your vision, which may include a prescription to correct your astigmatism.  Eyeglasses or contact lenses will help you to focus and to see more clearly.

  • Eyeglasses. Astigmatism can be treated with a pair of prescription eyeglasses.  The lens will have a prescription that compensates for the astigmatism. This prescription provides additional power in specific parts of the lens.  The correction power lies along a specific axis.
  • Contact lenses.  Contact lenses may provide clearer vision and a wider field of view.  A special toric soft contact lens offers astigmatism correction for many patients. This contact lens is weighted so that it maintains the correct axis when worn. Another contact lens option is a rigid gas-permeable (RGP or “hard”) contact lenses to help reshape the cornea decreasing the astigmatism.
  • Laser and other refractive surgery procedures. LASIK or PRK surgery can correct astigmatism by reshaping the cornea.  With LASIK using Custom-Vue Wavescan, your  treatment is tailored to your eyes.  Dr. Moran has great success treating patients with astigmatism.

Let us help you achieve your best vision.  Schedule an appointment to correct your vision.  Click here for more information on LASIK

How Does LASIK Work?

How the laser works to improve your vision during LASIK surgery.

LASIK vision correction uses a laser to reshape your cornea to help you see better.  To apply the laser treatment, Dr. Moran uses an excimer laser which emits a cool beam of ultraviolet light to precisely remove corneal tissue.  The reshaped cornea allows for light rays to focus properly on the retina to give you clearer vision.  

open book Think of the cornea as a closed book with 500 pages.  We create the flap about 100 pages into the book. Once the flap is opened, we apply the laser treatment to correct your vision in the last 400 pages of the book.

After your flap is lifted, the excimer laser applies pulses of ultraviolet across the cornea in a custom pattern designed for your eyes.  These precise light rays are able to remove as little as 0.25 microns of tissue at a time. How small is a micron?  One micron is a thousandth of a millimeter.

How the cornea changeS DUring LASIK

The laser treats your cornea to give you better vision.  Your cornea may be too long, too flat, or irregularly shaped.

  • If you are nearsighted, the laser will make the cornea more flat;
  • if you are farsighted, the laser will make the center of the cornea steeper.  
  • If you have an astigmatism, the laser will smooth your corneal tissue into a more symmetrical shape. 
  • If you have a combination of issues, the laser can treat  nearsightedness with astigmatism, as well as farsightedness with astigmatism.
How the treatment is determinedCustom vue

In order to create your treatment plan, Dr. Moran does careful calculations using the data from your pre-operative testing. He takes into account your age and your visual needs. Then, the laser is programmed with your unique measurements.  Once programmed, the laser is controlled by computer settings programmed to correct your specific refractive error.  We use Custom-Vue Wavescan technology.  It is called “Custom-Vue” since the pattern of treatment is customized for each patient to give you the best possible vision. 

Dr. Moran will ask you to focus on a light while the laser is being applied.  While it is important to keep your eye focused during the treatment, the laser has an added safety feature. The laser uses an eye-tracking system that monitors any eye movements and keeps the laser beam on target during surgery. Studies have shown that eye trackers produce better outcomes and decrease complications.  If your eye moves during the surgery, the laser will stay centered.  It will track and follow your eye movements. 

What to expect After LASIK

Post Op LASIK patientWhen the laser treatment is done, you will notice clearer vision than when you entered the room.  However, your vision will still be a little blurry – similar to seeing under water. The blurriness is because you have a lot of drops in your eyes!  Dr. Moran will have you sit up and look across the room at a clock about 10 feet away.  You will be able to tell him what time it is, even if you weren’t able to see the clock when you walked into the room. Your surgery day instructions are to go home and keep your eyes closed for the rest of the day.  Your vision will fluctuate as your eyes are healing, however, the next day you can drive to the office for your 1-day PO LASIK appointment.

 

To see if LASIK is right for you, schedule your FREE Consult today.  Call, email or text our office for your appointment.  Learn more about, just click LASIK

 

 

 

 

 

Your LASIK Experience

Patients often ask…what happens at the LASIK Center?

Dr. Moran with the Sightpath LASIK team.

Our LASIK surgery center is just off of Schoenersville Road in Bethelehem.  Although we do our surgery at a separate facility, our office staff is there with Dr. Moran, so you will see familiar faces!

When you arrive at the LASIK Center, you are greeted by one of our staff members.  Your family member or friend can stay with you while we review your paperwork, medications and post-op instructions – it’s always good to have an extra pair of ears listening while we go over details! The total time at the laser center is usually under 1 hour.

Next, we get you ready for surgery.  We apply a series of eye drops and review what happens in the laser suite.  During the procedure, Dr. Moran explains each step of the way, so you know what to expect.

In the LASIK Suite
  1. The team makes you comfortable on the surgery bed. Your head rests on a horseshoe shaped pillow.
  2. We place a patch on your left eye.
  3. Then, your right eye is held open with a lid holder (no need to worry about blinking during the procedure!).
  4. Dr. Moran creates a flap using the Intralase laser.  You will feel some pressure as he applies a ring on your eye, before the laser is applied.  Your vision will go dark for a few seconds as he creates the flap.   In just a few seconds, the flap is done! Your vision comes right back after the ring is removed.
  5. Next, he lifts the flap and centers your eye under the Visx laser.
  6. The laser treatment is applied.  It is painless…all you need to do is look at a yellow light while the laser is working.
  7. Then, he smoothes the flap back into place and the lid holder is removed.  The right eye is done!
  8. Dr. Moran repeats the procedure in the left eye.

When you enter the LASIK room, Dr. Moran, his surgical assistant, and the laser engineer are waiting for you. They give you a LASIK buddy to hold…he’s a little bit of comfort that goes a long way to making you feel secure!

LASIK Buddy offers some comfort

Your LASIK Buddy

After about 15-20 minutes, Dr. Moran walks you out of the LASIK room.  You’ll be able to see us waiting for you in the hallway!  We put drops in your eyes before you head home, and review the post-op instructions again.  Once you put on your sunglasses, you are good to go.

At the surgery center, we have a room with closed circuit tv screens. If your companion wants to watch and record the procedure, we will sit with them and explain what is happening.  If they don’t want to watch, (no pressure!) they can wait for you in the waiting room.

WHEN YOU GO HOME:

The day of your surgery, it is important to keep both eyes closed as much as possible.  We give you sunglasses to wear home, so you can open your eyes to walk to the car.  Close your eyes for the ride home, but you can open them again to walk into your house.

Put on your eye shield as soon as you arrive at home. Then it is time to rest with your eyes closed.  Listen to music, an audiobook, or podcast…or just go to sleep. The eye shields should be worn for sleeping for the next 7 days, so that you don’t accidentally touch or rub your eyes.

If you have questions once you are home, call us!  We always have someone on call to answer our patients concerns.

WHAT OUR PATIENTS SAY

Overwhelmingly, our patients comment about how fast the procedure was…and how easy!  We most commonly hear, “That was so much easier than I expected, why did I wait so long!?!”

Interested in LASIK?  Come in for a free consultation to find out if LASIK is right for you.  Click to find out what happens at your LASIK Consult