It’s Our 2nd Anniversary!

our office in Fountain Hill

Two years have passed since the start of Moran Eye Associates in Fountain Hill! We are so happy to have welcomed Dr. Moran’s former patients and many new patients too!

Although our practice is young, we’ve all been together for a long time. Here is a look at Moran Eye Associates by the numbers.

Dr. Moran has been practicing in the Lehigh Valley since 1990. He started Moran Eye Associates in April of 2017, where he continues to provide quality, compassionate medical and surgical care for his patients.

(again!) Dr. Moran’s first employee was Beth Handwerk, who was a member of the team at Trachtenberg-Moran. After almost 30 years, Beth & Dr. Moran are still working together. Beth is the office manager here at Moran Eye Associates.

Mandy Bolton & Cindy Male both started working with Dr. Moran at the turn of the century! They have been part of Dr. Moran’s team for 19 years.

Bobbi has worked with Dr. Moran’s surgical patients since 2011. Starting first as his LASIK coordinator, she now works with cataract patients too.

Dr. Tang joined our growing practice one year ago. She quickly became an essential part of our team. Dr. Tang has expertise in all aspects of medical eye care, contact lenses and low vision devices.

The numbers add up to an experienced team of eye care professionals that continue to work together to give our patients quality eye care. You can benefit from our commitment to our patients by making an appointment for yourself and your family!

All About Styes

What is a Stye?

A stye is a painful swollen spot in the upper or lower eyelid, near the lash line.  The stye develops due to an infection in the eyelash follicles or oil glands at the lid margin.

The inflamed area may be tender to the touch.  It appears as a red bump, possibly with a yellowish spot where pus has collected, like a pimple. It can occur on both the upper and lower eyelid, and is common in both children and adults.  Styes develop gradually and sometimes go away on their own.

Home Care: What should I do if I feel a stye developing?

  1. Apply warm moist compresses 10 minutes 4 times a day.
  2. Keep your eyelids clean. Use warm water and baby shampoo on a cotton ball.
  3. STOP wearing eye makeup. Covering up a stye may slow your healing.
  4. Don’t wear contacts. Wear your glasses until the stye is gone.
  5. Wash your hands!  Keep your hands clean and don’t share washcloths or towels with others.
  6. Do NOT Squeeze! Styes should not be squeezed or punctured at home.
When should I see the doctor?

If the stye is painful, causes vision problems, or does not improve after a few days, call for an appointment. You may need medication to treat the infection. When in doubt, pick up the phone and give us a call.  We are always willing to discuss your symptoms and bring you in to the office if needed.

After your eye is healed, it is important to replace all of your eye makeup that has come in contact with your infected eye.  That includes eyeliner, mascara, concealer and eye pencils.

Is there any way to prevent a stye?

A stye develops due to a blocked pore, so it makes sense that keeping your eyelids clean is the best way to prevent styes. Don’t sleep in your makeup!  Take the time to remove ALL makeup before you go to bed each night.  Replace your eye makeup every six months, and don’t share it with others.

Cleanse your eyelids in the morning as well to keep the lid margins clear. The crusty discharge that accumulates overnight in the corners and on the lashes should be cleared away with the warm water and baby shampoo method.

To read more about keeping your eyes healthy…scroll through the Moran Eye Associates blog.  You’ll find helpful information on eye care from our doctors and staff.  

 

 

Proud of our Eagle Scout!

Congratulations to Jagger

Bolton, Eagle Scout!

 

Jagger Bolton, Mandy’s son, started with scouting at age seven with Troop 58 in Slatington, nine years later, he earned the rank of Eagle Scout.  Jagger’s Eagle Scout project was to rejuvenate the fish pond outside of the Springside Fish Hatchery in Slatington.

In the picture at right, PA State Representative Zachary Mako recognizes Jagger’s achievement with a special commendation from the State of Pennsylvania.  Family and friends were all on hand to congratulate Jagger at his Eagle Scout ceremony.

 

The renovation project took months to complete.  The first step was to  remove all of the fish from the hatchery, transferring them to local creeks. After the fish were relocated, he began work on the fish pond itself.  The project included repair and painting of the fence, beautification of the landscaping and installing a new bench so local residents could enjoy the view.

A project on this scale was not possible without the help of the community.  Jagger acknowledges the generosity of area businesses who donated items or gave discounts for supplies and equipment.

Jagger also wants to thank his friends and family who donated their time and energy.  They persevered through a rainy summer to get it all done.  From spreading mulch to preparing meals for the volunteers, Jagger’s crew made it all possible.

The photos below help to tell the story of a job well done!

Innovative Cornea Care

Corneal Therapy offers Successful Healing

Moran Eye Associates’ Dr. Bianca Tang recently used an innovative treatment to help a patient’s cornea heal faster and more effectively.  This treatment promotes healing using amniotic membranes suspended in a ring that sits on the eye like a contact lens.

The patient had been using prescription drop therapy over a period of months to help with a painful area of corneal thinning, but her eye wasn’t getting better. She was in pain, and and she was having cloudy vision. She was over 80 years old, and had other health issues that caused slower healing.

What did the patient think of the process?

“Dr. Tang recommended a new procedure that cured my cornea erosion issue. It was a stem cell lens that aided healing of the cornea. I now have my sight back in both eyes with no pain. Thank you so much for using this new procedure. It worked like a charm.”

The treatment Dr. Tang recommended was Prokera.  The amniotic membranes in Prokera are safe, promote new cell growth, and prevent the development of scar tissue. The membrane itself dissolves after one week, and the doctor removes the ring following treatment.

Dr. Tang’s response to the results.

“The outcome was even better than I could have imagined. The area of epithelial defect that covered almost a quarter of her cornea was completely resolved. The most rewarding part of this treatment is knowing that the patient was no longer in pain, and that her vision was much improved.”

Studies show that using amniotic membranes:

  • Reduces pain
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Reduces Scar Formation
  • Introduces essential factors for new cell growth

Whether managing disease, trauma, or post-operative care, healing of the ocular surface is essential to patients’ comfort and vision.

At Moran Eye Associates, our doctors offer excellent care that is personalized, innovative and effective. You can depend on us for all of your eye care needs for your entire family.

Another Staff Certification Achievement!

The certificate has arrived, so now it is official!

 

Bobbi Spain has received her COA designation from the International Joint Commission on Allied Health Personnel in Ophthalmology (JCAPHO). Bobbi is our surgical coordinator, who works with LASIK and cataract patients. She was surprised to see that the package from JCAPHO also included an official COA card, pin and patch!

The Certified Ophthalmic Assistant (COA) is a core designation for eye care professionals. Along with hours spent under the teaching and supervision of an Ophthalmologist, COA applicants must complete an independent study course. The COA exam is three hours in length.  It is comprised of 200 scored multiple-choice questions in 19 specific content areas including:

  • Microbiology
  • Surgical Assisting
  • Ophthalmic Imaging
  • Patient services and education
  • Medical ethics, legal and regulatory issues.

To provide the best care for our patients, the staff at Moran Eye Associates makes learning a priority.  Every member of the team takes part in monthly compliance training, as well as taking on additional programs of study in general ophthalmology, low vision, dry eye management, regulations and billing.  They also attend industry conferences each year to keep up with advances in technology and and patient care.

In 2017, Mandy, Beth and Dr. Moran attended the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) conference in New Orleans. In April of this year, Bobbi and Cindy accompanied Dr. Moran to the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons (ASCRS) in Washington, D.C.

Bobbi joins Mandy and Cindy, who already have their COA certificates on display.  Mandy received her COA in 2017.  Cindy has been a COA since 2004.  In order to maintain certification, a total of 18 credits in continuing education must be completed every three years. Eighteen credits is an easy to complete at Moran Eye Associates, where continuing education plays a key role in our success!

 

What Does 20/20 Vision Mean?

Eye chart and glasses

How Vision is Measured

 

The distance vision of a normal human eye is defined at 20/20.  This number illustrates what a person with normal vision can see at twenty feet.  Your visual acuity is measured on how it relates to vision at 20 feet.

  • If your vision is 20/40, you can see at 20 feet, what a normal eye can see at 40 feet.
  • If your vision is 20/100, you can see at 20 feet, what a normal eye can see at 100 feet.
  • If your vision is 20/400, you can see at 20 feet, what a normal eye can see at 400 feet.

When you read an eye chart, chances are that person testing you is paying attention to what you say, as well as how you say it. They will know if you are seeing clearly or are struggling and making guesses. It never pays to cheat on your eye test!

Driving vision requirements

How well do I need to see to drive?  

Although each state determines their specific requirements, generally 20/40 vision is needed to pass the driving test.  If you need glasses to see 20/40, it will be indicated on your driver’s license. While your distance vision is key to passing the driving test, there are other factors that are considered as well.  For complete information on what is required in Pennsylvania, click on the link.

Pennsylvania Drivers Visual Standards

After vision correction surgery, like LASIK or cataract surgery, you may be able to see well enough to have the vision correction restriction removed from your license.

What is legally blind?

If you cannot see any letters below the 20/200 line, even when wearing glasses or contacts, you are considered legally blind.  If your vision can be corrected by putting on a pair of glasses, you may have poor vision, but you are not legally blind.

Woman in Slit lampI see 20/20, do I need an eye exam?

Absolutely!  Measuring your vision is an important part of your comprehensive exam, but there is so much more that we check at your visit. We will check your pupils, eye pressure and field of vision.  We will record your visual history, health history and medications. The doctor will examine the health of your eyes using a slit lamp microscope, checking for eye disease, including glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and cataracts.

Early detection of eye disease is your best defense against vision loss.  So even if you don’t need a new pair of glasses, make sure to schedule your regular check-up, so you can keep seeing your best!

 

Now Scheduling FRIDAYS!

Making an appointment just got easier…we have now added  Fridays to our schedule!

 

To schedule your visit contact our office at 610-628-2022  – OR – click to request an appointment ONLINE.

Any way that you schedule it, you can be certain that you are making an appointment for quality eye care, with less time in the waiting room, more time in the exam room.

You can trust Moran Eye Associates to care for all of your vision needs including:
  • Comprehensive Exams
  • LASIK
  • Cataract Surgery
  • Dry Eye Treatment
  • Laser Treatment
  • Diabetic Eye Care
  • Macular Degeneration 
  • Glaucoma. 

 

We participate in most medical insurances and now accept VSP Vision Insurance as well!

 

Continuing to Learn and Innovate

Rooftop viewEducational Excursion 

Dr. Moran, Bobbi, and Cindy attended the ASCRS (American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons) Conference in our nation’s capital, Washington, DC. The conference ran over a “long” April weekend and presented a great opportunity to learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of cataracts and glaucoma, as well as vision correction procedures like LASIK.

 

The ASCRS Conference a great way to learn.

“Ongoing education is a priority not only for physicians.  It is important for every member of our team to be up-to-date on innovations and technology now available to offer the best eye care.  While at this conference, we were able to learn from industry experts on ways to more effectively care for our patients.  It was also a chance to share what we do at Moran Eye Associates,”  Dr. Moran explains.

Information sessions at the conference included new treatment techniques to manage dry eye, cataract surgery case studies, and advances in pre-surgical measurements.  There was much to learn in classes and from networking and exchanging ideas with other professionals there.  They were able to talk about how our new in-office procedures for floaters and dry eye are helping our patients see more clearly.

Cindy uses Virtual Reality to LearnNew Ways to Learn

In addition to the formal educational sessions, there were also many opportunities for hands-on learning.

Using Virtual Reality, Bobbi & Cindy were able to have a 360-degree view inside the eye.  They were able to witness how the eye is affected by glaucoma, macular degeneration, and cataracts.  They agreed it was a little disorienting to be “floating” around inside an eye, but it was a memorable experience to see detailed images of changes to retina, vitreous and lens.

We look forward to using the knowledge gained to improve the care of our patients. After a busy and productive few days away, it is back to the office!