610-628-2022 [email protected]

Measuring Eye Pressure (IOP)

As part of your comprehensive eye exam, we check the pressure of your eye, the Intraocular Pressure (IOP).  This test, called tonometry, is one way to see if you are at risk for glaucoma. Regular screenings are a simple way to monitor your eye health.  Early detection is essential in the treatment of glaucoma, since many times there are no symptoms with increased pressure, unless it is sudden.

UNDERSTANDING EYE PRESSURE:

Increased pressure (IOP)

Inside the eye, there is a cycle of fluid production and fluid drainage.  This fluid, in the front part of your eye, is called the the aqueous humor.  The aqueous humor nourishes your eye and helps it to keep its shape.  If this cycle is out of balance, and more fluid is produced than is able to drain effectively, IOP increases.  Over time, this Increased eye pressure may cause damage to the optic nerve.  A general guideline for normal eye pressure is between 10 and 21 mm/hg.

HOW WE MEASURE EYE PRESSURE:

Measuring IOPIn our office, we measure eye pressure by instilling a drop that numbs your eye.  Using a blue light, we then use an applanation tonometer that gently touches the surface of your eye. This painless test is a very effective way of measuring your pressure.  It is helpful for the patient to relax and breathe normally while we perform this test.

Although there are many other ways of measuring eye pressure, many people are familiar with the “puff of air test”.   This test, called non-contact tonometry, uses a rapid air pulse to flatten the cornea. Your pressure is measured by detecting the force of the air against your eye.  Although we don’t use this process, often when we ask patients them to “put your chin in the chin rest and forehead against the band” they worry we are going to puff air at them. They don’t seem to like it! 

We can’t emphasize enough the importance of comprehensive eye exams. It is especially important to have an eye exam if you have a family history of eye disease, diabetes or high blood pressure. The best way to protect your vision is to come in for an exam, where Dr. Moran will evaluate your risk for disease and advise you of the optimal schedule of visits to protect your eye health.

Schedule your exam today, by calling our office at 610-628-2022, or by filling out the form on the website.

Dry Winter Eyes

Winter is the season for dry eyes.  Tears provide moisture

If you suffer from dry, irritated eyes all year round, chances are they will be worse in the winter.  When the heat is on in the house, office and car,  your eyes become more dry.  

Artificial tears, also called Lubricating Eye Drops – are your first line of defense.  Whether they are your own natural tears, or artificial tears  from a bottle, tears keep your eyes healthy and help you to see better in 4 unique ways. 

The 4 Benefits of Tears: 
  1. Protect the eyes & keeps them lubricated
  2. Wash away irritants & foreign objects
  3. Reduce the risk of infection in the eyes
  4. Maintain a smooth, clear surface on the eye to help you see clearly.

If your eyes are dry, you are missing out on the benefits that tears provide. Don’t suffer, there are different strategies to treat dry eyes. To find out the best treatment for you, make an appointment.  Dr. Moran will discuss the best way to improve your comfort and vision.  In the meantime, start using over the counter artificial tears for immediate relief. 

How do we treat the lack of tears? 

There are three main methods of treatment: Supplement, Stimulate, or Retain your tears.

SUPPLEMENT: The simple solution is to need to supplement your tear film. Using over-the-counter artificial tears can bring you immediate relief. Keep some on hand. We have them available for purchase in the office.

STIMULATE: There are drop medications that help you produce more tears and better quality tears on your own. Restasis and Xiidra are available by prescription. These prescriptions do not take effect instantly. They begin to improve your tear film over time.

RETAIN: There are two ways to help you retain your tears, heat therapy and punctal plugs.
Using heat therapy, we can improve the flow of the outer, lipid layer of tear film. This oily outer layer seals in your tears, and keeps your tears from evaporating too quickly. Heat therapy is an in-office, relaxing, 15-minute treatment of continuous warmth that you enjoy while sitting in a comfortable recliner!
Punctal plugs work to keep your tears from draining from your eyes too quickly. These tiny silicone plugs are easily inserted in the opening on the inner corner of your eyelids. Closing this “drain” conserves your tears, retaining them in your eyes for increased comfort and better vision.

Click here for more information about treating dry eye http://moraneyeassociates.com/dry-eyes/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does this Test Do? Pinhole Test

Why do I see better when I look through the pinhole?

When we check your vision, we test each eye individually using an occluder.

The occluder is a simple device that covers one eye at a time.  If your vision isn’t clear, we move the pinholes into place and have you look at the eye chart again. If your vision improves with the pinholes, it means that your vision may be corrected with glasses or contacts.

The pinhole is a simple way to focus light.  When you look through this tiny hole, light enters through the center of the lens of the eye only. If you can read the 20/20 line when looking through the pinholes, you should be able to see 20/20 with the correct prescription.  Click to learn more about 20/20 vision

Ever wonder why squinting helps you to see better?  It’s the same principle as looking through the pinholes.  By squinting, you reduce the focusing area, which makes things appear sharper.

If your vision does not improve when you look through the pinhole, there may be other factors that affect your vision.  The other issues that could be affecting your vision may include cataracts or problems with your retina.  Lack of vision improvement with this simple test can be the first step in diagnosing, and correcting your vision problems.

 

 

 

 

 

Patient Reviews…Up in Lights!

Have you seen our patient reviews?

This billboard says it all, thanks Michelle!

This summer, Moran Eye Associates will be featured on electronic billboards around the Lehigh Valley.  Choosing the content of the billboards was easy…our patient reviews speak volumes about our practice!  We are proud of our reputation for excellence.

Look for our colorful billboards throughout the Lehigh Valley!

Our staff is committed to patient education.

Dr. Tang is terrific and very thorough!

Our doctors and staff are proud to be called “awesome”!

 

Dr. Moran and Dr. Tang are now accepting new patients.  We offer medical, surgical and vision care to people of all ages. If you would like to make an appointment, just fill out the information to the right.  You can also call or text us at 610-628-2022.

 We are happy to offer your family the kind of quality eye care that our patients are talking about!  Click here for more Patient Reviews

 

 

 

Dr. Tang Teaches Eye Care to Local Students

Eyes in classroom

As part of Moran Eye Associates outreach program, Dr. Bianca Tang is visiting schools in Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton to teach young students about vision. Using crafts and a story time presentation, she explains to first graders how the eye works and the importance of protecting your eyes.

“It’s been fun working with the students. They are good listeners and are enthusiastic to share what they know about vision.”

She shows the students with pictures of different kinds of animal eyes. These pictures illustrate how although cat, horse, lizard, fish and lizard eyes all look very different, the design gives the animals the right vision for their environment.

She talks with the students about how to protect their eyes, so that they can have good vision that lasts them a lifetime. They discuss how wearing sunglasses protects your eyes from the UV rays of the sun. They also talk about the importance of eye protection while playing sports, and how everyone should wear eye shields at work and at home if there is a danger of something hitting their eye. Everyone attending gets a pair of sunglasses with UV protection to take home.

To help the students learn about the parts of the eye, the children do a craft project to make an eye of their own, complete with iris, pupil and lots of eyelashes!

If you would like Dr. Tang to make a visit to your school, please contact our office.

If you would like Dr. Tang to visit your school, please contact our office to set up a date.

Insurance and Eye Care

 

Health insurance can be very confusing. We talk to patients about it everyday, so we thought it would be helpful to outline the basics.

We can’t stress enough that every plan is different. While you may be covered for a service, you may have a co-pay or deductible that must be paid. If you aren’t sure, please check with your human resources department or insurance company.


MEDICAL INSURANCE: Exams that qualify for Medical Insurance include care and treatment of eye disease and injury. Among the conditions covered are Glaucoma, Cataracts, Diabetic Retinopathy, Macular Degneration, Injury to the Eye, and Infection.

Most medical insurances do NOT cover the cost of checking to see if you need new glasses. This part of the exam is called Refraction (Better 1 or 2?), and is NOT part of medical eye care. Refraction is a separate charge.


VISION INSURANCE: Some benefit plans include vision insurance. Each plan’s coverage is unique, so you need to check specifics with your insurance plan. Items that MAY be covered under vision insurance at a reduced cost or co-pay include your routine eye exam, contact lens fitting, glasses and contact lenses.


Again, we recommend checking with your insurance company to verify your coverage, co-pay and deductible.

We are here to help if you need any treatment information or diagnosis codes so that you can discuss specifics with your insurance provider.

Ultimately, your insurance company considers you responsible to investigate your coverage and will often only provide that information to you, not to your doctor.