All About Styes

What is a Stye?

A stye is a painful swollen spot in the upper or lower eyelid, near the lash line.  The stye develops due to an infection in the eyelash follicles or oil glands at the lid margin.

The inflamed area may be tender to the touch.  It appears as a red bump, possibly with a yellowish spot where pus has collected, like a pimple. It can occur on both the upper and lower eyelid, and is common in both children and adults.  Styes develop gradually and sometimes go away on their own.

Home Care: What should I do if I feel a stye developing?

  1. Apply warm moist compresses 10 minutes 4 times a day.
  2. Keep your eyelids clean. Use warm water and baby shampoo on a cotton ball.
  3. STOP wearing eye makeup. Covering up a stye may slow your healing.
  4. Don’t wear contacts. Wear your glasses until the stye is gone.
  5. Wash your hands!  Keep your hands clean and don’t share washcloths or towels with others.
  6. Do NOT Squeeze! Styes should not be squeezed or punctured at home.
When should I see the doctor?

If the stye is painful, causes vision problems, or does not improve after a few days, call for an appointment. You may need medication to treat the infection. When in doubt, pick up the phone and give us a call.  We are always willing to discuss your symptoms and bring you in to the office if needed.

After your eye is healed, it is important to replace all of your eye makeup that has come in contact with your infected eye.  That includes eyeliner, mascara, concealer and eye pencils.

Is there any way to prevent a stye?

A stye develops due to a blocked pore, so it makes sense that keeping your eyelids clean is the best way to prevent styes. Don’t sleep in your makeup!  Take the time to remove ALL makeup before you go to bed each night.  Replace your eye makeup every six months, and don’t share it with others.

Cleanse your eyelids in the morning as well to keep the lid margins clear. The crusty discharge that accumulates overnight in the corners and on the lashes should be cleared away with the warm water and baby shampoo method.

To read more about keeping your eyes healthy…scroll through the Moran Eye Associates blog.  You’ll find helpful information on eye care from our doctors and staff.  

 

 

Complete Eye Care

A patient asked the other day, “Do you do regular eye exams?” 

Of course we do!  At Moran Eye Associates we offer Complete Eye Care, which includes Vision, Medical and Surgical services.

VISION:  We accept VSP & NVA 

  • Routine Eye Exams
  • Contact Lenses: Traditional & Specialty Lenses

MEDICAL: We accept most medical insurances

  • Diabetic Eye Care: Diabetic Retinopathy
  • Glaucoma Care: Medical and Surgical Treatment Options
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Dry Eye Treatment: Diagnostic Services & Thermal Therapy
  • Eye Emergencies
  • Infection/Inflammation
  • Low Vision Services

SURGICAL: Dr. Moran does surgery at the Surgery Center of Allentown, Sightpath LASIK Center in Bethlehem, as well as some procedures in our Delaware Avenue office

  • Cataracts
  • LASIK
  • PRK
  • Laser Floater Removal
  • Glaucoma Eye Surgery
  • Foreign Body Removal
  • Eye Lid Surgery

Please contact our office if you need an appointment for your eye care. Call or text us at 610-628-2022, or send us an email by filling out the form on the right!

 

 

Solve Your Glare Problems!

Cocoons Fit-Over Eyewear

Moran Eye Associates now offers Cocoons Eyewear, our doctors’ choice for professional-grade fitover sunglasses.  Designed specifically to fit over your prescription glasses, these lightweight sunglasses come in a variety of tints, styles and sizes to fit your vision needs. Stop in our office to see for yourself!

The unique design of Cocoons isolates your eyes from the elements, keeping you free from glare, harmful UV rays, and fluctuating light conditions.  These lenses and the frames work together to keep your eyes protected.

Eliminates glare for people with normal vision and low vision.

These polarized glasses offer UV400 protection, scratch resistant technology, and a one-year warranty. If glare is a problem, polarized lenses provide a significant reduction in glare compared to regular tinted sunglasses. Most sunglasses sold at the store are not polarized unless specifically indicated.

Cocoons are designed to reduce glare and to enhance vision. The specialized color options were developed to  target different issues. We recommend that you try on the different lens types to see what works best for you.

  • Gray: for natural color definition and general daily use. Reduces light sensitivity while eliminating reflected surface glare.
  • Amber: filters scattered blue light to increase contrast and provide improved depth perception in varying lights conditions. Amber is the preferred color for driving.
  • Copper: filters scattered blue light and minimizes color distortion to deliver enhanced contrast and color definition
  • Yellow: ideal for low light conditions.  Maximizes contrast for improved definition and depth perception while eliminating glare. Best in dusk and dawn light, but not the best option for general daily use.
  • Blue Mirror: maximizes glare elimination and filters additional blue light for improved contrast while delivering true color definition.
Recommended for Nighttime Driving – Twilight Lenses

Nighttime driving has unique vision issues, due to glare from headlights and reduced available light. Cocoons have developed a special Twilight lens that Dr. Tang recommends. These specialty Twilight lenses help to solve night driving issues because of their anti-reflective coating.

Dr. Tang explains the benefits of the Twilight lenses, “The key to better nighttime vision is anti-reflective coating.  Although yellow and amber lenses help with contrast and clarity, they reduce the available light, which can make it hard to see well when you are driving. You have to balance the benefit of increased contrast with the reduction in brightness. Polarized lenses work well in the natural daylight, but don’t help with artificial lights from headlights and streetlights at night. Additionally, polarized lenses cut out 50% of light, which is counterproductive in the dark.”

The Twilight lens system blocks 100% of harmful UV light and 60% or more of harmful High Energy Visible (HEV) blue light while providing 93% overall visible light transmission. The unique filtering properties of these HEV filters effectively reduce scattered blue light and improve contrast without compromising overall light transmission. The lens system is protected by a one-year scratch resistance warranty and includes an anti-reflective coating to minimize glare and halos created by artificial light sources.

Help for patients who have heightened photophobia (light sensitivity).

Low-vision patients may benefit from a different colored tints to give them the best acuity.  Dr. Bianca Tang explains, “Sometimes, the tint correlates with specific medical conditions, but most of the time, it is a matter of personal preference. All of these lenses reduce glare and heighten contrast, which is important for low-vision patients.”  Additional color options include.

  • Boysenberry (pink): reduces glare and heightens contrast. Blocks 90% of blue light.
  • Hazelnut (brown:) reduces glare and heightens contrast. Blocks 98% of blue light.
  • Orange: enhances contrast by intensifying the background to improve object definition and clarity. Blocks 100% of blue light.
  • Lemon (yellow): enhances contrast and visual acuity in low light conditions. Blocks 40% of blue light.

Whatever your vision needs, we can help you to see your best.  We offer the latest technology to help keep your eyes healthy and to protect your vision for years to come.

Call or text us at 610-628-2022 for more information on enhancing your vision. If you’d like to schedule a visit, just click to request an appointment.

 

 

 

 

 

Patient Education – 1st Grade Edition!

Dr. Tang Teaches About Eye CareEyes in classroom

On Tuesday, June 5th, Dr. Bianca Tang brought eye education to 1st grade classrooms at Harry S. Truman Elementary School in the Salisbury School District, and Paxinosa Elementary School in the Easton Area School District.  Her visits were part of Moran Eye Associates commitment to community outreach.

 

Dr. Tang contacted local school nurses and offered to teach the children about eyecare, to help the children feel more comfortable about visiting the eye doctor.  She explained the importance of taking care of your eyes and wearing eye protection. She talked to them about what to expect at an eye exam, and showed them the tools that the eye doctor uses to check their vision.  They talked about how important it is to visit the eye doctor even if you don’t need glasses.

Not surprisingly, all of the 1st graders knew what pink eye was!

The children were excited to learn about how the eyes work. Dr. Tang explained that your eyes can play tricks on you, and played some games with optical illusions.  The students did a great job identifying the eyes of different animals…

fish, birds, horses, goats and reptiles…and seeing the differences between each one.

Then it was time to get out the glue sticks!  Each student made a craft which helped them to identify the parts of the eye.  They quickly learned that the color part of the eye is IRIS, and the black center part is the PUPIL.  They finished off their project with beautiful eyelashes!

At the end of the 30-minute presentation, the children enthusiastically answered questions about what they learned. We aren’t sure who had more fun, the children or our staff!

Next stop on the education tour is Lincoln Elementary in Emmaus, and Jaindl Elementary in the Parkland School District, next week.

If your child’s school would be interested in an eye care program for any grade, please don’t hesitate to contact our office at 610-628-2022.

Seeing Double?

Mandy’s twin granddaughter’s, Aubrey & Harper are protecting their eyes with Moran Eye Associates sunglasses for children. Dr. Tang will be presenting these to the elementary students she is visiting. Our staff will be visiting local classes and providing fun eye facts to the students.

 

Ask the Expert on WLEV 100.7

…or as we like to call it, “ASK DR. MORAN”!

Dr. Mark Moran will be featured on 100.7 WLEV’s Morning Show with Selena & Crockett each Thursday on 100.7 WLEV.

Dr. Moran was selected to be a part of “Ask the Experts,” a drive-time feature aired between 8-8:15 am weekdays.   Dr. Moran will provide medical expertise on the Thursday edition of this program.  He will answer questions about keeping your eyes healthy and getting the most from your vision.  The Morning Show’s Kevin Crockett will ask Dr. Moran questions sent in by morning show listeners.

Our expert will answer questions about: 

  • LASIK Surgery
  • Dry Eyes
  • Screen Time Solutions
  • Your Risk factors for Eye Diseases
  • Your Eyes as You Get Older – Cataracts

Patient education has always been a priority at Moran Eye Associates because Dr. Moran knows that an informed patient makes the best healthcare decisions.  We invite you to listen in every Thursday for great advice on eye care.

Have a question?

If you have a question for Dr. Moran, you can send a message to the Morning Show, or email us directly with your question.  Of course, we will reply to the emails sent to [email protected].  We will also pass along your inquiry to WLEV, where Crockett might read it on the air!

Mark your calendars, and be sure to listen in to Ask the Experts with Dr. Mark Moran Thursdays at 8 am!

 

We have SOLAR ECLIPSE GLASSES!

Protect your eyes with complimentary #SolarEclipse glasses, courtesy of Dr. Mark Moran.

Solar Eclipse Glasses

Stop in at Moran Eye Associates, 1204 Delaware Avenue, Fountain Hill to pick up your pair!*  Our office is open 8am-4pm, Monday-Thursday.

Post pictures of yourself in your protective specs with the hashtag #MoranLASIK.  We’d love to see photos of you keeping it safe during the eclipse!

For more information on eye safety during the eclipse, click here to read an article written by Dr. Moran “Why you shouldn’t look at a Solar Eclipse”

*Limit 2 per person.

 

Why You Shouldn’t Look at a Solar Eclipse

On August 21st, 2017 the United States will see its first solar eclipse since 1979.

This eclipse will be visible to all of the continental United States, unlike the 1979 event which was seen by residents in only five northwestern states.  The visible path of the 2017 eclipse will span the country.

A solar eclipse is when the new moon comes between the earth and the sun. Where you are on earth determines how much of the sun is blocked by the moon. The 2017 eclipse will have almost 3 minutes of totality (when the sun is completely blocked by the moon) and the best location to see this, is Hopkinsville, KY. At totality, the only thing that will be visible is the sun’s corona and it will be dark enough to see stars during the day. Only a small strip of the United States will experience totality as the eclipse passes overhead.

You’ve probably heard you that shouldn’t look at the sun during an eclipse. This information is true, except only at totality. If you’re in a region with 100% coverage and the moon has fully covered the sun, it is ok to look ONLY at that time. Misjudging the timing could be blinding. Since most of the United States will not be able to view the eclipse at totality, as a general rule, it is best to not look directly at the eclipse.

Most of have inadvertently glanced at the sun. We quickly close our eyes, turn away or shield our eyes. That’s your body’s natural defense to the BRIGHTNESS. But the brightness is only part of the harmful effect. The sun is essentially a thermonuclear explosion, or atom bomb, constantly exploding. This reaction is emitting harmful ultraviolet light (UV).

If you were to look at the sun at any time, your cornea will unwittingly do its job and focus that UV light right in the center of your macula. While the sun is partially blocked by the moon the brightness will be decreased, and your natural reaction to look away will be diminished.  Although the sun will be less bright, the UV rays will still be as strong.  These UV rays will seriously damage your macula.  At totality, both the brightness and the UV rays are blocked by the moon.  That is why ONLY AT TOTALITY, for those few minutes, it is OK to look at the sun when it is fully hidden behind the moon and only the corona is visible.

To safely view the eclipse, you need a special filter. The filter should have ISO certification and should be free of any pinholes or damage. Old filters should be discarded as they can lose effectiveness. Proper planning and proper viewing will ensure your eyesight and preserve it for the next United States viewable eclipse in 2024.

Solar Eclipse Illustration

Eclipse fun facts:

  • How does the moon which is 400 times smaller than the sun cover all of the sun? The Moon is currently conveniently located about 400 times closer than the sun.
  • The Moon is slowly moving away from the Earth and it’s estimated in 1.4 billion years there will be no such thing as a solar eclipse on earth.

Photo: NASA