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How Does LASIK Work?

How the laser works to improve your vision during LASIK surgery.

LASIK vision correction uses a laser to reshape your cornea to help you see better.  To apply the laser treatment, Dr. Moran uses an excimer laser which emits a cool beam of ultraviolet light to precisely remove corneal tissue.  The reshaped cornea allows for light rays to focus properly on the retina to give you clearer vision.  

open book Think of the cornea as a closed book with 500 pages.  We create the flap about 100 pages into the book. Once the flap is opened, we apply the laser treatment to correct your vision in the last 400 pages of the book.

After your flap is lifted, the excimer laser applies pulses of ultraviolet across the cornea in a custom pattern designed for your eyes.  These precise light rays are able to remove as little as 0.25 microns of tissue at a time. How small is a micron?  One micron is a thousandth of a millimeter.

How the cornea changeS DUring LASIK

The laser treats your cornea to give you better vision.  Your cornea may be too long, too flat, or irregularly shaped.

  • If you are nearsighted, the laser will make the cornea more flat;
  • if you are farsighted, the laser will make the center of the cornea steeper.  
  • If you have an astigmatism, the laser will smooth your corneal tissue into a more symmetrical shape. 
  • If you have a combination of issues, the laser can treat  nearsightedness with astigmatism, as well as farsightedness with astigmatism.
How the treatment is determinedCustom vue

In order to create your treatment plan, Dr. Moran does careful calculations using the data from your pre-operative testing. He takes into account your age and your visual needs. Then, the laser is programmed with your unique measurements.  Once programmed, the laser is controlled by computer settings programmed to correct your specific refractive error.  We use Custom-Vue Wavescan technology.  It is called “Custom-Vue” since the pattern of treatment is customized for each patient to give you the best possible vision. 

Dr. Moran will ask you to focus on a light while the laser is being applied.  While it is important to keep your eye focused during the treatment, the laser has an added safety feature. The laser uses an eye-tracking system that monitors any eye movements and keeps the laser beam on target during surgery. Studies have shown that eye trackers produce better outcomes and decrease complications.  If your eye moves during the surgery, the laser will stay centered.  It will track and follow your eye movements. 

What to expect After LASIK

Post Op LASIK patientWhen the laser treatment is done, you will notice clearer vision than when you entered the room.  However, your vision will still be a little blurry – similar to seeing under water. The blurriness is because you have a lot of drops in your eyes!  Dr. Moran will have you sit up and look across the room at a clock about 10 feet away.  You will be able to tell him what time it is, even if you weren’t able to see the clock when you walked into the room. Your surgery day instructions are to go home and keep your eyes closed for the rest of the day.  Your vision will fluctuate as your eyes are healing, however, the next day you can drive to the office for your 1-day PO LASIK appointment.

 

To see if LASIK is right for you, schedule your FREE Consult today.  Call, email or text our office for your appointment.  Learn more about, just click LASIK

 

 

 

 

 

Expert Education – OCT Lecture

 

Continuing Education Lecture – Dr. Moran Presents

Dr. Moran recently gave a presentation to local optometrists at our office in Fountain Hill.  This lecture was part of a professional continuing education program approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Optometry. The doctors that attended earned two continuing education credits, and learned valuable diagnostic skills.

OCT lecture certificate

The topic was History and Mechanism of Retinal Coherence Tomography (OCT).  The OCT is a device that scans the retina using light waves.

Dr. Moran illustrated each of the retina’s distinctive layers, which are seen clearly on the test. The scan allows the doctor to check on the health of the eye, measuring and tracking changes to the retina.  This information is important to  diagnose retinal disease such as macular degeneration.  In addition to retinal scans, the OCT is also used to take pictures of the optic nerve, which helps to monitor glaucoma.

Since the lecture was done at our office, the doctors were able to get hands-on experience with our OCT equipment. During the lecture, Dr. Moran presented case studies, which offered the doctors a chance to make their own diagnoses based on the scans and some basic patient information – gender, date of birth, date.

Case Study

In one such case study, the date of the scan was an important diagnostic clue!  Remember the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017?  And do you remember the warnings not to look directly at the eclipse without special lenses.  The scan was taken on August 22nd, the day after the eclipse.  As The test showed that he had retinal damage because he looked directly at the eclipse…he didn’t listen to the warningsLecture shows eclipse damage

In addition to the presentation,  everyone who attended the lecture was treated to a homemade dinner featuring Beth’s turkey barbeque, with all the fixings.  We celebrated the season of thanksgiving with pumpkin and apple pies!  Education is always easier on a full stomach!

UP NEXT

In 2020, Dr. Moran will be taking this presentation on the road.  He will be giving a similar seminar on interpretation of OCT tests at an upcoming ophthalmology conference.  Education has always been an important part of his professional life, and is a vital part of our practice.  Whether it is educating doctors, staff or patients, Dr. Moran provides excellent instruction!

Along with his medical practice, Dr. Moran is also a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM).  He graduated from PCOM in 1986. In 2017, he earned a Masters Degree in Healthcare Informatics from Drexel University.

Want to know more about your vision and the health of your eyes?  We are happy to take the time to help you understand, just ask!

 

Halloween Contact Lenses are Scary!

It’s that time of year again.

Decorative Contact Lens

Halloween is a great time to get into costume to display your alter ego or just to have some plain old scary fun. Over the last few years, decorative contact lenses have become part of these costumes. And, with familiarity comes complacency. The fact that decorative contact lenses are safe when dispensed and used properly, leads to cutting corners on their care.

Contact lenses, both the decorative type and the type that help you see, are medical devices, licensed and regulated by the FDA. They are regulated just like heart pacemakers, hip implants and other manufactured equipment used on and in the body. Selling contacts without a prescription is illegal.

Even though costume contact lenses for Halloween have no corrective vision power for nearsightedness or farsightedness, they still require a prescription from a doctor.

Dr. Moran likes to use the expression that some things are a “victim of their own success”. Since contact lenses are for the most part safe and effective, slacking in their care may allow you to “get away with it” without consequence. The problem isn’t with the lenses themselves but how they’re used. The stakes are high and cutting corners is not a risk you should take. Poor fitting lenses and improperly used lenses could lead to corneal ulcers, which could actually lead to permanent  blindness.

To be safe in wearing decorative lenses you should do several things:

1. Get an eye exam.

2. Never buy contacts without a prescription.

3. Never share contact lenses.

4. Don’t sleep in your lenses.

For more information you can visit the FDA’s website regarding decorative lenses.

Be Safe During Contact Lens Health Week

It’s hard to find someone who doesn’t wear contact lenses, has worn contact lenses in the past, or knows someone who wears contact lenses. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has declared August 19th to the 23rd contact lens health week. https://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses

Soft contact lenses

That’s right…the CDC is concerned about contact lenses! Contact lenses are medical devices, just like a heart pacemaker or an insulin pump. Contact lenses have been in use for over 100 years and during that time the technology behind them has progressed and been perfected. For that reason, complications and problems with them are less common.  However, that only applies if they are used as prescribed.

Human nature is when you are comfortable with a situation, you may take some shortcuts regarding safety. Because contacts are considered so safe, most contact lenses users are prone to intentionally and unintentionally cut corners. Take the advice of Dr. Tang, Dr. Moran, and the CDC:  DON’T TAKE SHORTCUTS!

 

Here are a few key reminders on handing and wearing your contact lenses.

  1. Don’t sleep in your lenses.
  2. Tap water, hot tub or swimming pool water are not good for your contact lenses.
  3. Wash your hands before handing your lenses.
  4. Follow your eye doctors instructions for use of your case and disinfecting solutions.
  5. Replace your contact lenses case every 3 months.
  6. Replace your contact lenses as prescribed.
  7. See your eye doctor as recommended.

Contact lenses are safe when used appropriately, but things can go very bad if they are used improperly. You INCREASE your risk of permanent vision loss when you don’t follow the instructions above!  Be safe and enjoy your contact lenses:  follow the rules.

Your LASIK Experience

Patients often ask…what happens the day of your LASIK procedure?

Dr. Moran with the Sightpath LASIK team.

Our LASIK surgery center is now  located right in our office!

When you arrive for your surgery,  you will be taken back to an exam room.  Your family member or friend can stay with you while we review your paperwork, medications and post-op instructions – it’s always good to have an extra pair of ears listening while we go over details! The total time is usually under 1 hour.

Next, we get you ready for surgery.  We apply a series of eye drops and review what happens in the laser suite.  During the procedure, Dr. Moran explains each step of the way, so you know what to expect.

In the LASIK Suite
  1. The team makes you comfortable on the surgery bed. Your head rests on a horseshoe shaped pillow.
  2. We place a patch on your left eye.
  3. Then, your right eye is held open with a lid holder (no need to worry about blinking during the procedure!).
  4. Dr. Moran creates a flap using the Intralase laser.  You will feel some pressure as he applies a ring on your eye, before the laser is applied.  Your vision will go dark for a few seconds as he creates the flap.   In just a few seconds, the flap is done! Your vision comes right back after the ring is removed.
  5. Next, he lifts the flap and centers your eye under the Visx laser.
  6. The laser treatment is applied.  It is painless…all you need to do is look at a yellow light while the laser is working.
  7. Then, he smoothes the flap back into place and the lid holder is removed.  The right eye is done!
  8. Dr. Moran repeats the procedure in the left eye.

When you enter the LASIK room, Dr. Moran, his surgical assistant, and the laser engineer are waiting for you. They give you a LASIK buddy to hold…he’s a little bit of comfort that goes a long way to making you feel secure!

LASIK Buddy offers some comfort

Your LASIK Buddy

After about 15-20 minutes, Dr. Moran walks you out of the LASIK room, and checks your eyes in the exam chair.  We put drops in your eyes before you head home, and review the post-op instructions again.  Once you put on your sunglasses, you are good to go.

WHEN YOU GO HOME:

The day of your surgery, it is important to keep both eyes closed as much as possible.  We give you sunglasses to wear home, so you can open your eyes to walk to the car.  Close your eyes for the ride home, but you can open them again to walk into your house.

Put on your eye shield as soon as you arrive at home. Then it is time to rest with your eyes closed.  Listen to music, an audiobook, or podcast…or just go to sleep. The eye shields should be worn for sleeping for the next 7 days, so that you don’t accidentally touch or rub your eyes.

If you have questions once you are home, call us!  We always have someone on call to answer our patients concerns.

WHAT OUR PATIENTS SAY

Overwhelmingly, our patients comment about how fast the procedure was…and how easy!  We most commonly hear, “That was so much easier than I expected, why did I wait so long!?!”

Interested in LASIK?  Come in for a free consultation to find out if LASIK is right for you.  Click to find out what happens at your LASIK Consult

Dr. Tang Teaches Eye Care to Local Students

Eyes in classroom

As part of Moran Eye Associates outreach program, Dr. Bianca Tang is visiting schools in Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton to teach young students about vision. Using crafts and a story time presentation, she explains to first graders how the eye works and the importance of protecting your eyes.

“It’s been fun working with the students. They are good listeners and are enthusiastic to share what they know about vision.”

She shows the students with pictures of different kinds of animal eyes. These pictures illustrate how although cat, horse, lizard, fish and lizard eyes all look very different, the design gives the animals the right vision for their environment.

She talks with the students about how to protect their eyes, so that they can have good vision that lasts them a lifetime. They discuss how wearing sunglasses protects your eyes from the UV rays of the sun. They also talk about the importance of eye protection while playing sports, and how everyone should wear eye shields at work and at home if there is a danger of something hitting their eye. Everyone attending gets a pair of sunglasses with UV protection to take home.

To help the students learn about the parts of the eye, the children do a craft project to make an eye of their own, complete with iris, pupil and lots of eyelashes!

If you would like Dr. Tang to make a visit to your school, please contact our office.

If you would like Dr. Tang to visit your school, please contact our office to set up a date.