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Halloween Contact Lenses are Scary!

It’s that time of year again.

Decorative Contact Lens

Halloween is a great time to get into costume to display your alter ego or just to have some plain old scary fun. Over the last few years, decorative contact lenses have become part of these costumes. And, with familiarity comes complacency. The fact that decorative contact lenses are safe when dispensed and used properly, leads to cutting corners on their care.

Contact lenses, both the decorative type and the type that help you see, are medical devices, licensed and regulated by the FDA. They are regulated just like heart pacemakers, hip implants and other manufactured equipment used on and in the body. Selling contacts without a prescription is illegal.

Even though costume contact lenses for Halloween have no corrective vision power for nearsightedness or farsightedness, they still require a prescription from a doctor.

Dr. Moran likes to use the expression that some things are a “victim of their own success”. Since contact lenses are for the most part safe and effective, slacking in their care may allow you to “get away with it” without consequence. The problem isn’t with the lenses themselves but how they’re used. The stakes are high and cutting corners is not a risk you should take. Poor fitting lenses and improperly used lenses could lead to corneal ulcers, which could actually lead to permanent  blindness.

To be safe in wearing decorative lenses you should do several things:

1. Get an eye exam.

2. Never buy contacts without a prescription.

3. Never share contact lenses.

4. Don’t sleep in your lenses.

For more information you can visit the FDA’s website regarding decorative lenses.

Beautifying South Bethlehem

Moran Eye Associates recently took part in a beautification project on the Southside of Bethlehem.  Planters all around the Southside are being transformed into works of art by local artists…and aspiring artists, like us, too!

We were inspired by the digital artwork from our website home page, and decided to bring this colorful “celestial eye” design to the planter.  It was a team effort, with Mandy, Bobbi & Dr. Tang all pitching in on the painting.  We had lots of people stopping by to offer encouragement as we worked.  It was a fun project, and gave us a chance to meet some of the people who live and work close by.

 

Eye in the starry sky

Moran Eye Associates Website Home page

If you are out and about in Bethlehem, you can find our planter across the street from the post office at 128 South 4th Street.  It’s right outside A List Hair Salon.  There are still planters available that need some TLC.  If you know anyone who would like to adopt a planter, contact Missy Hartney at the Southside Arts District to find out how to take part in the program.

This beautification program is part of the South Bethlehem’s Main Street Initiative.  Moran Eye Associates is glad to be a part of the exciting things happening in our community.  Click to find out more about events and news in the Southside Arts District.

 

 

 

Dr. Tang Teaches Eye Care to Local Students

Eyes in classroom

As part of Moran Eye Associates outreach program, Dr. Bianca Tang is visiting schools in Allentown, Bethlehem and Easton to teach young students about vision. Using crafts and a story time presentation, she explains to first graders how the eye works and the importance of protecting your eyes.

“It’s been fun working with the students. They are good listeners and are enthusiastic to share what they know about vision.”

She shows the students with pictures of different kinds of animal eyes. These pictures illustrate how although cat, horse, lizard, fish and lizard eyes all look very different, the design gives the animals the right vision for their environment.

She talks with the students about how to protect their eyes, so that they can have good vision that lasts them a lifetime. They discuss how wearing sunglasses protects your eyes from the UV rays of the sun. They also talk about the importance of eye protection while playing sports, and how everyone should wear eye shields at work and at home if there is a danger of something hitting their eye. Everyone attending gets a pair of sunglasses with UV protection to take home.

To help the students learn about the parts of the eye, the children do a craft project to make an eye of their own, complete with iris, pupil and lots of eyelashes!

If you would like Dr. Tang to make a visit to your school, please contact our office.

If you would like Dr. Tang to visit your school, please contact our office to set up a date.

The Moran’s Foster Family – Courtesy of Last Chance Ranch

 

We had such a positive reaction to our post about Holly from Last Chance Ranch, that we wanted to share some family photos about the other animals that now call the Moran’s farm their home.

Let’s start with the rescued horses, PD and Ellie.

PD and Ellie out grazing!


PD…showing some personality! PD is short for Personnel Director, he used to run at Belmont.

Ellie Close Up

Barney

Barney, a beautiful mixed-breed dog, also came from Last Chance Ranch. Dr. Moran has been heard saying that Barney is the best dog they ever had! He has been living in comfort (and bringing much joy) for over 5 years.

Horses and dogs aren’t the only animals the Morans have brought home from Last Chance Ranch…they have also fostered ducks & a swan that now swim in their pond.

If you have some room for a pet in your heart and your home, or just want to see how you can help their cause, contact the caring people at Last Chance Ranch http://www.lastchanceranch.org/

 

 

Proud of our Eagle Scout!

 

Congratulations to Jagger Bolton, Eagle Scout!

Jagger Bolton, Mandy’s son, started with scouting at age seven with Troop 58 in Slatington, nine years later, he earned the rank of Eagle Scout.  Jagger’s Eagle Scout project was to rejuvenate the fish pond outside of the Springside Fish Hatchery in Slatington.

PA State Representative Zachary Mako was on hand to recognize Jagger’s achievement with a special commendation from the State of Pennsylvania.  Family and friends were all on hand to congratulate Jagger at his Eagle Scout ceremony.

 

The renovation project took months to complete.  The first step was to remove all of the fish from the hatchery, transferring them to local creeks. After the fish were relocated, he began work on the fish pond itself.  The project included repair and painting of the fence, beautification of the landscaping and installing a new bench so local residents could enjoy the view.

A project on this scale was not possible without the help of the community.  Jagger acknowledges the generosity of area businesses who donated items or gave discounts for supplies and equipment.

Jagger also wants to thank his friends and family who donated their time and energy.  They persevered through a rainy summer to get it all done.  From spreading mulch to preparing meals for the volunteers, Jagger’s crew made it all possible.