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Q&A about LASIK with Intralase Technology

Patients are curious about what happens during LASIK surgery. Q&A

Dr. Moran knows that a well-informed patient makes the best medical decisions. Understanding what happens during LASIK can lead to a more calm and comfortable experience. We’ve highlighted the most commonly asked questions about all-laser LASIK with Intralase.  The best way to find out if you are a candidate for this vision correction procedure, is to come in for a free one-hour consult appointment.

LASIK vision correction is a 2-step process.

  1. First, we create the flap in the surface of the cornea.
  2.  Second, we lift the flap and apply laser treatment to reshape the corneal tissue.
What is Intralase?

Intralase flap creationA:   The IntraLase Method uses laser light to create a flap in the outer layer of your cornea.  The laser creates an even layer of microscopic bubbles under the corneal surface.  The flap is hinged, like the page of a book.  Dr. Moran then lifts the flap by gently separating the tissue where these bubbles have formed. After the flap is lifted, Dr. Moran moves to the second step of the procedure, applying the laser treatment to reshape the cornea.

What makes using Intralase technology unique?

A:  The IntraLase Method uses a laser to create the flap.  This laser-guided application creates a smooth even surface after your flap is lifted.

Are there benefits to using the Intralase Method?

A:  Although the risk of flap-related complications with LASIK is very low, with Intralase, the rate of flap complications are further reduced.  The flap created by the laser is determined and created by your surgeon, so it is tailored to the contours of your eye.

How long does LASIK surgery take?

A: The total time in the surgery suite takes about 20 minutes.  During step 1 of the procedure, creating the flap, the laser application takes about 15-20 seconds per eye.  Step 2 of the procedure, applying the laser treatment, depends on your prescription.  It can take from just a few seconds, to about one minute per eye.  Dr. Moran will  let you know the length of your specific treatment. During the laser application, he will count down the seconds, so you know how much time remains.  He keeps you informed about what you can expect, every step of the way.

What is the difference between LASIK and PRK (photorefractive keratectomy)?

A:  PRK vision correction is done without creating a flap.  Instead, PRK starts by removing a small area of tissue on the surface of the cornea.  A clear contact lens is placed on the eye after PRK surgery, to aid in comfort while healing.  Dr. Moran will remove the contact lens when the cornea is healed, usually about 3 days after surgery.  The recovery time for PRK is longer than LASIK. With LASIK you should be able to drive the day after surgery, while after PRK surgery, you may not see clearly enough to drive for a few days.  Why do patients choose PRK?  PRK is an option for patients who may not be able to have LASIK due to thinner corneas.  PRK is also preferred for patients who are at risk for eye injuries, including patients who do boxing, mixed martial arts, or who are joining certain levels of the military.

Ready for your  LASIK Consult?  Fill out the form, give us a call, or send a text, to get started on your way to better vision with LASIK.

 

 

 

 

Expert Education – OCT Lecture

 

Continuing Education Lecture – Dr. Moran Presents

Dr. Moran recently gave a presentation to local optometrists at our office in Fountain Hill.  This lecture was part of a professional continuing education program approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Optometry. The doctors that attended earned two continuing education credits, and learned valuable diagnostic skills.

OCT lecture certificate

The topic was History and Mechanism of Retinal Coherence Tomography (OCT).  The OCT is a device that scans the retina using light waves.

Dr. Moran illustrated each of the retina’s distinctive layers, which are seen clearly on the test. The scan allows the doctor to check on the health of the eye, measuring and tracking changes to the retina.  This information is important to  diagnose retinal disease such as macular degeneration.  In addition to retinal scans, the OCT is also used to take pictures of the optic nerve, which helps to monitor glaucoma.

Since the lecture was done at our office, the doctors were able to get hands-on experience with our OCT equipment. During the lecture, Dr. Moran presented case studies, which offered the doctors a chance to make their own diagnoses based on the scans and some basic patient information – gender, date of birth, date.

Case Study

In one such case study, the date of the scan was an important diagnostic clue!  Remember the solar eclipse on August 21, 2017?  And do you remember the warnings not to look directly at the eclipse without special lenses.  The scan was taken on August 22nd, the day after the eclipse.  As The test showed that he had retinal damage because he looked directly at the eclipse…he didn’t listen to the warningsLecture shows eclipse damage

In addition to the presentation,  everyone who attended the lecture was treated to a homemade dinner featuring Beth’s turkey barbeque, with all the fixings.  We celebrated the season of thanksgiving with pumpkin and apple pies!  Education is always easier on a full stomach!

UP NEXT

In 2020, Dr. Moran will be taking this presentation on the road.  He will be giving a similar seminar on interpretation of OCT tests at an upcoming ophthalmology conference.  Education has always been an important part of his professional life, and is a vital part of our practice.  Whether it is educating doctors, staff or patients, Dr. Moran provides excellent instruction!

Along with his medical practice, Dr. Moran is also a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Surgery at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM).  He graduated from PCOM in 1986. In 2017, he earned a Masters Degree in Healthcare Informatics from Drexel University.

Want to know more about your vision and the health of your eyes?  We are happy to take the time to help you understand, just ask!

 

What Does this Test Do? Part 2: Topography

Corneal Topography rings

Corneal Topography Test

As you look into through the bright red colored rings, the topography machine creates a map of the clear front portion of your eye, the cornea.  Corneal topography allows us to detect irregular conditions of the surface that can’t be measured in other ways.

How does a map of the cornea help us evaluate your vision?

A healthy cornea is very important to your vision, because 77% of the eye’s focusing ability is done by the cornea.  Light enters the eye through the clear cornea. The shape and curve of the cornea plays an important role in the quality of vision. An eye with normal vision has an evenly rounded cornea, like a basketball.  An eye with an astigmatism has an unevenly curved cornea, more like a football.

Corneal topography is performed by projecting lighted rings onto the surface of the eye.  These rings are reflected back and measured by the instrument, and a map of the cornea is created.

Topography is an important tool in measurements for LASIK Surgery.  LASIK surgical correction changes the shape of the cornea to help patients see more clearly.  During LASIK, the shape of the cornea is changed to help images focus properly on the retina. Below you can see how the shape of the eye is changed with the laser after LASIK surgery. The photos show the same eye before and after LASIK.

Corneal Topography is just one of the testing resources that we use when treating our patients.  You can trust Moran Eye Associates to use the tools that we need to keep your eyes healthy, and your vision the best it can be.  If you have questions about your vision, contact Moran Eye Associates.  We focus on making vision clearer.

 

Your Pharmacist – A Great Resource

Pharmacist and prescription medications

Talk to your pharmacist…you’ll be glad you did!

Have you spoken to your pharmacist lately?  We know that prescription medications can be expensive. Your pharmacist can help you manage your medications, and may be able to help you find savings on your prescriptions.

Make friends with your pharmacist.

Your pharmacist is an essential part of your healthcare team.  They may be aware of resources that can save you money, all you have to do is ask!  Ask if you can speak with your pharmacist, they are happy to take a few minutes to review your medications.  Most pharmacies have a private place for patient consultations.

Discount PROGRAMS.

Your pharmacist might be aware of discount programs that can save you money.  They have a complete list of your medications, so they can can review the list with you.  Talk to the pharmacy staff to see if there are any discount plans or strategies that might help you save some money.

ASK YOUR DOCTOR.

Ask your doctor if you there is a generic version of the medication.  Generics are less expensive, and have the same active ingredients as the brand-name medications.

We want you to stay on track with the medications that are prescribed for you.  The first step toward that goal is making sure that you get the medications that you need to stay healthy.

We know that an informed patient makes the best healthcare decisions, so make sure ask questions!  You can benefit from relationships with every member of your healthcare team.

 

 

 

 

 

Allergies & Your Eyes

When you see the trees and flowers start to bloom, do you think “YAY, Spring!” or “OH, NO, Allergies!”?

Do your eyes feel itchy and irritated with seasonal allergies? Don’t suffer, come in for relief from the symptoms of allergy eyes. Dr. Moran and Dr. Tang can evaluate the best treatment for your allergy eyes that will help you enjoy the beauty of Spring.

SYMPTOMS OF ALLERGIC CONJUNCTIVITIS: Itching, redness, tearing and eyelid swelling. This condition is often accompanied by other signs of allergies, like a stuffy, itchy and runny nose.  It’s not contagious since it is caused by dust or allergens. Artificial tears, antihistamine eye drops, and medication can help relieve the symptoms.

If you use an over-the-counter (OTC) allergy medicine like to treat a runny or congested nose, while this medicine dries out our sinuses, it causes dryness in your mouth and eyes too! Use lubricating eye drops (artificial tears) when you take allergy medicines, and you give your eyes the moisture that they need to feel better and see clearly.

There are also specific OTC allergy eye drops that are can be used to treat irritated allergy eyes, but these drops aren’t suitable for long-term use. We don’t recommend drops that “get the red out”. These drops may offer a quick fix for red eyes, but they don’t give you any long-term benefits. In fact, you may become dependent on them, since they don’t solve your dry eye issues.

Our doctors can diagnose if there are other underlying causes for the eye irritation…it might not be just allergies. If you have a crusty, yellowish discharge you may have an infection that needs to be treated with antibiotics.

We are here to help you maintain good eye health and excellent vision no matter the season. Call us, text us, or fill out the form on this page to make an appointment with Dr. Moran or Dr. Tang.

Quick Q&A: Diabetes & Your Eyes

 

How does Diabetes affect your eyes?

Diabetic eyes

Diabetics need to see their eye doctor at least once a year.

Diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels that supply the retina.  These damaged blood vessels may leak, swell or bleed causing problems with your vision. Diabetes can also increase the growth of cataracts, and increase your risk of glaucoma.  Changes in your blood sugar can cause blurriness in your vision, and fluctuations to your glasses prescription.

What is the best way to keep my eyes healthy?

Annual eye exams are important, because left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can worsen, and lead to blindness.  Patients with uncontrolled blood sugar are at a higher risk for problems, but even patients who control their diabetes can develop issues.

Are there warning signs of diabetic eye disease?

Whether you are diabetic or not, if you notice any changes to your vision, you should see your doctor as soon as possible.  If you notice a change in prescription, any cloudiness, blind spots or increased floaters in your vision, you should see your eye doctor.

Will controlling my blood sugar help my vision?

Yes. Swings in your blood sugar readings can cause changes to your vision.  High blood sugar can cause swelling in the eye, which can affect your vision.  If your blood sugar fluctuates, your vision will fluctuate too, and you may find that your glasses don’t work effectively.

Is there a way to treat diabetic retinopathy?

There are different options for treating diabetic retinopathy. Dr. Moran and Dr. Tang can discuss which options are best for your needs.  There laser treatments which target the damaged vessels, as well as medications which can help preserve your vision.

If you are Diabetic, Annual Vision Exams are a MUST!

Diabetics have special needs when it comes to taking care of their eyesight.  With a dilated exam, your doctor can detect and begin to treat diabetic eye disease before you notice any vision changes. Your annual exam allows our doctors to check for early onset cataracts and glaucoma.

If you (or someone you care about) has diabetes, make sure to connect with the trusted eye care team at Moran Eye Associates.
Call our office to schedule an appointment 610-628-2022.