Author, Author

Dr. Moran was recently published in Lehigh County Health & Medicine magazine. The article “Floaters in My Eyes” discusses the occurrence of floaters and treatment options now available.

Dr. Moran has been successfully treating floaters with an in-office laser procedure, called Vitreolysis. This treatment option targets floaters with laser energy. The laser pulses change the collagen of the floater into a gas, removing it from the patient’s vision.

Lehigh County Health & Medicine Spring 2019

To read more of the articles in this publication, click here.

Eyes are the Windows to your Health

Your annual eye exam offers a look at more than just your vision.

view of dilated eye

You may have heard that the eyes are the windows to your soul, but did you know that they provide a look at your overall health as well.

Your dilated eye is an open window where blood vessels and nerves can be clearly seen. The view through the open pupil is a unique means of detecting health issues including:

  • Diabetes
  • Glaucoma
  • Hardening of the Arteries
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Macular Degeneration

Your eye doctor may be the first to alert you to developing health problems.The American Optometric Society reported that in just one year, over 250,000 patients were diagnosed with diabetes after their optometrists reported concerns. Early diagnosis and treatment are vital for the health and vision of diabetic patients.

Changes or fluctuation in your vision may also be an indicator of a larger health problem.  Report blurred vision to your eye doctor, it may be a sign of increased blood sugar levels and the need for medical treatment.

Uncontrolled diabetes can have severe consequences. Loss of vision due to diabetic retinopathy is a primary concern. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people under the age of 74, so a regular schedule of dilated eye exams are important for diabetic patients. If you know someone who is diabetic,or has a family history of the disease, make sure that they are getting the eye care that they need.

Our goal is to keep you healthy!

Dr. Moran and Dr. Tang not only provide excellent vision care, they are essential partners for your general health and well-being.  If you are overdue for a vision exam, don’t delay. Call us to schedule your appointment, Monday through Friday from 8 am to 4 pm.

 

For a video of a dilated eye exam, click here National Eye Institute Dilated Eye Exam

Quick Q&A: Diabetes & Your Eyes

How does Diabetes affect your eyes?Diabetic eyes

Diabetes can cause damage to the blood vessels that supply the retina.  These damaged blood vessels may leak, swell or bleed causing problems with your vision. Diabetes can also increase the growth of cataracts, and increase your risk of glaucoma.  Changes in your blood sugar can cause blurriness in your vision, and fluctuations to your glasses prescription.

What is the best way to keep my eyes healthy?

Annual eye exams are important, because left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can worsen, and lead to blindness.  Patients with uncontrolled blood sugar are at a higher risk for problems, but even patients who control their diabetes can develop issues.

Are there warning signs of diabetic eye disease?

Whether you are diabetic or not, if you notice any changes to your vision, you should see your doctor as soon as possible.  If you notice a change in prescription, any cloudiness, blind spots or increased floaters in your vision, you should see your eye doctor.

Will controlling my blood sugar help my vision?

Yes. Swings in your blood sugar readings can cause changes to your vision.  High blood sugar can cause swelling in the eye, which can affect your vision.  If your blood sugar fluctuates, your vision will fluctuate too, and you may find that your glasses don’t work effectively.

Is there a way to treat diabetic retinopathy?

There are different options for treating diabetic retinopathy. Dr. Moran and Dr. Tang can discuss which options are best for your needs.  There laser treatments which target the damaged vessels, as well as medications which can help preserve your vision.

If you are Diabetic, Annual Vision Exams are a MUST!

Diabetics have special needs when it comes to taking care of their eyesight.  With a dilated exam, your doctor can detect and begin to treat diabetic eye disease before you notice any vision changes. Your annual exam allows our doctors to check for early onset cataracts and glaucoma.

If you (or someone you care about) has diabetes, make sure to connect with the trusted eye care team at Moran Eye Associates.
Call our office to schedule an appointment 610-628-2022.

 

What Does 20/20 Vision Mean?

Eye chart and glasses

How Vision is Measured

 

The distance vision of a normal human eye is defined at 20/20.  This number illustrates what a person with normal vision can see at twenty feet.  Your visual acuity is measured on how it relates to vision at 20 feet.

  • If your vision is 20/40, you can see at 20 feet, what a normal eye can see at 40 feet.
  • If your vision is 20/100, you can see at 20 feet, what a normal eye can see at 100 feet.
  • If your vision is 20/400, you can see at 20 feet, what a normal eye can see at 400 feet.

When you read an eye chart, chances are that person testing you is paying attention to what you say, as well as how you say it. They will know if you are seeing clearly or are struggling and making guesses. It never pays to cheat on your eye test!

Driving vision requirements

How well do I need to see to drive?  

Although each state determines their specific requirements, generally 20/40 vision is needed to pass the driving test.  If you need glasses to see 20/40, it will be indicated on your driver’s license. While your distance vision is key to passing the driving test, there are other factors that are considered as well.  For complete information on what is required in Pennsylvania, click on the link.

Pennsylvania Drivers Visual Standards

After vision correction surgery, like LASIK or cataract surgery, you may be able to see well enough to have the vision correction restriction removed from your license.

What is legally blind?

If you cannot see any letters below the 20/200 line, even when wearing glasses or contacts, you are considered legally blind.  If your vision can be corrected by putting on a pair of glasses, you may have poor vision, but you are not legally blind.

Woman in Slit lampI see 20/20, do I need an eye exam?

Absolutely!  Measuring your vision is an important part of your comprehensive exam, but there is so much more that we check at your visit. We will check your pupils, eye pressure and field of vision.  We will record your visual history, health history and medications. The doctor will examine the health of your eyes using a slit lamp microscope, checking for eye disease, including glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and cataracts.

Early detection of eye disease is your best defense against vision loss.  So even if you don’t need a new pair of glasses, make sure to schedule your regular check-up, so you can keep seeing your best!

 

What do Cataracts and M&Ms Have in Common?

The Cataract-M&M Connection!

Peanut M&M cross-section

If you know Dr. Moran, you know that he is an expert at making analogies to better explain vision and visual issues to our patients.  One of our favorite examples is how he explains what happens during cataract surgery.

 

Yes, that’s where the Peanut M&M comes in!

Dr. Moran explains that a mature cataract is like a peanut M&M. It has 3 major parts: capsule, cortex and nucleus.

  1. The capsule = candy coating.
  2. The cortex = chocolate.
  3. The nucleus = the peanut inside!

During cataract surgery, Dr. Moran will remove the nucleus and cortex (peanut & chocolate), while leaving

the capsule (the candy shell) in place.

After the cortex and the cataract are removed, he will insert a new lens in its place. This new intraocular lens (IOL) has a prescription in it, just like the lenses in your eyeglasses have a prescription in them.

After Cataract Surgery

Many patients tell us that they have the best vision of their lives following cataract surgery! They see more clearly and colors seem more vibrant.  Depending on the type of lens implant that they choose, they may not need to wear glasses at all!

If you, or someone you know, has noticed a change in their vision, come in for a cataract evaluation with Dr. Moran. He will dilate your eyes to see if cataracts are developing, and he will let you know if you are ready to have your cataracts removed.

Click here for more information about Cataracts.

 

 

 

 

 

Why So Many Drops?

DROPS, DROPS, when does it stop?

Eye Drops for Exams

Patients often ask when they come in to see Dr. Moran for a complete exam, diabetic exam  or cataract recheck,  “Why all these drops?”  Here is the simple explanation.

Scared child at dentist

Getting a comprehensive eye exam without dilation, is like going to the dentist and not opening your mouth. Sure, he can see your lips and the shape of your jaw but he’s unable to see the health of your teeth.

Dr. Moran can examine the lids, lashes, and cornea (outermost layer of your eye), but to see beyond the surface, you need the drops, drops and more drops.

Depending on your age, diagnosis and health history you may receive more drops than another.  Let’s discuss someone in their 60’s with diabetes or cataracts.

First, you will receive the “yellow drop”- No your eyes will not stay that color. This drop will allow us to check the intraocular pressure of your eye (glaucoma screen). It also acts as a mild numbing agent.

Next, you will receive a Phenylephrine drop. This is the drop which will dilate your pupil and allow Dr. Moran to see into the depths of the eye and examine the retina.

Lastly, comes the Mydriatic drop which paralyzes the iris muscle to keep the eye dilated for the duration of the examination.

That’s the answer to why all the drops. Now when will it STOP?

Usually, dilation lasts from 4-6 hours. It will affect your ability to work close-up and you will be sensitive to light. Blue eyes tend to stay dilated longer. It is not unusual for some patients to remain dilated for more than 6 hours, but dilation is not harmful to the eye.

You can drive if you are comfortable doing so. We recommend dark sunglasses and will provide you with them if you forget to bring yours.

Although being dilated can be an inconvenience, the benefit significantly outweighs the hassle.

Schedule your DILATED eye examination by calling or texting our office at 610-628-2022, we look forward to seeing you.

Contributed by Mandy Bolton, COA