The Moran’s Foster Family – Courtesy of Last Chance Ranch

We had such a positive reaction to our post about Holly from Last Chance Ranch, that we wanted to share some family photos about the other animals that now call the Moran’s farm their home.

Let’s start with the rescued horses, PD and Ellie.

PD and Ellie out grazing!

Ellie Close Up
PD…showing some personality! PD is short for Personnel Director, he used to run at Belmont.

Barney, a beautiful mixed-breed dog, also came from Last Chance Ranch. Dr. Moran has been heard saying that Barney is the best dog they ever had! He has been living in comfort (and bringing much joy) for over 5 years.

Horses and dogs aren’t the only animals the Morans have brought home from Last Chance Ranch…they have also fostered ducks & a swan that now swim in their pond.

If you have some room for a pet in your heart and your home, or just want to see how you can help their cause, contact the caring people at Last Chance Ranch http://www.lastchanceranch.org/

Saving Holly’s Sight

When Mark and Paulette Moran heard about a horse that needed eye surgery to save her sight, they knew it was time to come to the rescue. After sharing the news with the staff, Moran Eye Associates donated $1,000 to Last Chance Ranch to cover the cost of Holly’s surgery.


We quickly replied to their Facebook fundraiser for Holly:
“Our office, Moran Eye Associates would like to donate the full amount of $1,000 for Holly’s surgery and care. Dr. Mark Moran and staff are happy to support your organization. We know how important sight is to all of us, and to the animals in our lives. In fact, Dr. Moran would have been happy to assist in surgery, if he wasn’t taking care of our human patients that day!”

Jackie Burke, who is the Equine Health Manager of Last Chance Ranch started a fundraiser for Holly via their Facebook page. Here is Holly’s story…

Holly is a sweet Haflinger mare who was saved from a kill pen by Last Chance Ranch. Our vet discovered an inflamed area of her eye. After consulting with New Bolton Center’s Ophthalmologist, it was determined that Holly had Squamous Cell Carcinoma in her left eye, and beginning in her right eye.

The vet is hopeful and believes that Holly has an extremely good prognosis and will probably not lose any vision! Holly is a young horse, only in her teens with a lot of life left.

The surgery was successfully completed on February 26th. Holly is now recovering at New Bolton Center, and will be back at Last Chance Ranch soon. The best news is that Holly has a prospective adopter, as long as everything goes well with her recovery!

We will keep you updated on Holly’s progress! For more information about the good work of this local rescue, visit their website http://www.lastchanceranch.org

Last Chance Ranch Animal Rescue, Inc. (LCR) is a public volunteer, non-profit (501c3) organization rescuing and rehabilitating horses and domestic companion animals. Last Chance Ranch Animal Rescue is dedicated to promoting and educating the public to humane and responsible treatment of horses, ponies, donkeys, and mules (equines) and other domestic companion animals. Last Chance Ranch, Inc (LCR) provides a safe and secure refuge for abused, unwanted or neglected animals. LCR rehabilitates physical and psychological issues and places them into new homes where they receive the treatment and care they deserve.

Treating Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis)

Irritated, runny eyes…it is Pink Eye?

If you or your children have an inflammation in the eye, it could be pink eye. The medical term for pink eye is Conjunctivitis, an inflammation of the thin, clear covering of the outermost layer of the eye and the inside of the eyelids.

There are three different types of conjunctivitis: Viral, Bacterial and Allergic.

The treatment for each condition varies, so if you have an inflamed eye, make an appointment so our doctors can prescribe the specific treatment that will give you relief.  Conjunctivitis is very common and easily treated, so don’t suffer, call for an appointment when symptoms begin.

VIRAL CONJUNCTIVITIS: If it’s viral conjunctivitis, it usually affects one eye.  Because it is a virus, it is contagious, and can easily spread to your other eye.  You may experience a light discharge, excessive watering, itching and crusting on the eyelids.  Viral conjunctivitis cannot be treated with antibiotics.

BACTERIAL CONJUNCTIVITIS: If your inflamed eye has a heavy yellow or green discharge with crusting on the lids, you may have bacterial conjunctivitis.   This type of conjunctivitis easily spreads to both eyes. It is important to start antibiotic eye drops as soon as you start to have symptoms. Be careful wiping your eyes, use a clean tissue or gauze for each eye.

ALLERGIC CONJUNCTIVITIS: Itching, redness, tearing and eyelid swelling are all signs of allergic conjunctivitis. This condition is often accompanied by other signs of allergies, like a stuffy, itchy and runny nose.  It’s not contagious since it is caused by dust or allergens. Artificial tears, antihistamine eye drops, and medication can help relieve the symptoms.

For ALL types of eye inflammations, practice good hygiene. Assume that the condition is contagious until told otherwise.

  • WASH your hands frequently
  • STOP wearing contacts
  • THROW AWAY your old contact case
  • WASH your pillowcase
  • DISCARD old eye makeup

Warm compresses will give you relief from Viral, Bacterial and Allergic conjunctivitis.  Good hygiene practices are essential!

If you have questions about pink eye or any other eye condition, don’t hesitate to contact our office at 610-628-2022.

All About Styes

What is a Stye?

A stye is a painful swollen spot in the upper or lower eyelid, near the lash line.  The stye develops due to an infection in the eyelash follicles or oil glands at the lid margin.

The inflamed area may be tender to the touch.  It appears as a red bump, possibly with a yellowish spot where pus has collected, like a pimple. It can occur on both the upper and lower eyelid, and is common in both children and adults.  Styes develop gradually and sometimes go away on their own.

Home Care: What should I do if I feel a stye developing?

  1. Apply warm moist compresses 10 minutes 4 times a day.
  2. Keep your eyelids clean. Use warm water and baby shampoo on a cotton ball.
  3. STOP wearing eye makeup. Covering up a stye may slow your healing.
  4. Don’t wear contacts. Wear your glasses until the stye is gone.
  5. Wash your hands!  Keep your hands clean and don’t share washcloths or towels with others.
  6. Do NOT Squeeze! Styes should not be squeezed or punctured at home.
When should I see the doctor?

If the stye is painful, causes vision problems, or does not improve after a few days, call for an appointment. You may need medication to treat the infection. When in doubt, pick up the phone and give us a call.  We are always willing to discuss your symptoms and bring you in to the office if needed.

After your eye is healed, it is important to replace all of your eye makeup that has come in contact with your infected eye.  That includes eyeliner, mascara, concealer and eye pencils.

Is there any way to prevent a stye?

A stye develops due to a blocked pore, so it makes sense that keeping your eyelids clean is the best way to prevent styes. Don’t sleep in your makeup!  Take the time to remove ALL makeup before you go to bed each night.  Replace your eye makeup every six months, and don’t share it with others.

Cleanse your eyelids in the morning as well to keep the lid margins clear. The crusty discharge that accumulates overnight in the corners and on the lashes should be cleared away with the warm water and baby shampoo method.

To read more about keeping your eyes healthy…scroll through the Moran Eye Associates blog.  You’ll find helpful information on eye care from our doctors and staff.  

 

 

Your Vision After Cataract Surgery – Lens Choices

lens choicesWhen it is time for cataract surgery, you have choices to make that will determine your future vision.

During cataract surgery, Dr. Moran will remove the cloudy lens of your eye and replace it with a clear Intraocular Lens (IOL). Patients have the option to choose from different types of IOLs for their surgery.

While all the IOLs offer improved vision, there are some lens choices that offer additional features, such as astigmatism correction, and vision at fixed points of focus – near, intermediate and far vision. Dr. Moran will discuss these lens choices with you.  He will explain which option(s) are right for you, taking into consideration the health of your eye and your visual needs after surgery.

The chart below compares the features of the IOLs.  

The Basic lens offers 1 area of correction, and may be covered by your insurance. This lens offers clearer vision at one point of focus either distance or near.  For patients who don’t mind wearing glasses, this lens is a good option.

The Toric and ReSTOR lenses do more, so there is additional cost for these lenses. Insurance does not cover the cost of these lenses, since they are considered advanced technology lenses. These lenses are special order for you, so payment for these lenses is due one week prior to the surgery date.

The Toric lens corrects one point of focus, either distance or near, and corrects for astigmatism, which is an irregular shape of the cornea. Patients with a corneal astigmatism greater than 1.25 diopters are good candidates for this lens.

The ReSTOR lens offers multiple points of focus.  This lens is designed with concentric circles, each with a specific prescription power.  Your eye will be able to focus using the right power ring in the lens.  ReSTOR lenses are recommended for patients who have healthy eyes, and who are having surgery on both eyes done within a few weeks of each other.

More information about cataract surgery and your IOL choices will be discussed at your cataract evaluation appointment with Dr. Moran, and again with our surgery coordinator at your scheduling/measurement appointment.  We encourage all patients to check with their insurance company before their cataract surgery to find out specifics about what is covered under their plan.  Some plans have co-pays and deductibles that may affect the amount that the patient will have to pay.

Click to read more about Cataracts

6 Rules for Safe Contact Lens Wear

contact lens solutionThe largest risk of infection for contact wearers comes from improper use and handling of the contact lenses.

Contact lenses are convenient, comfortable and simple-to-use. It’s easy to forget that they are medical devices that need to be carefully used and stored – free from bacteria, dirt and germs.

Are you at risk for infection?

Almost one million cases of eye infections due to contact lens misuse were reported in the U.S. in just one year.  Misuse can be due to many reasons, including wearing your lenses too long, not following prescribed wearing schedules, sleeping in your lenses, and not cleaning your lenses properly.

The Center for Disease Control reports that 99% of contact lens wearers have worn, washed or stored their lenses in unhygienic ways.  If you have bad contact lens habits, it’s time to change, and follow the rules we’ve outlined for you.

washing handsALWAYS follow these 6 simple rules to prevent infection

1. Wash your hands with soap and water before handling your contact lenses…EVERYTIME!

2. Take out your lenses before showering, swimming and sleeping (naps & overnight).

3. Rub your lenses with disinfecting contact lens solution after you remove them.  Don’t use water to clean your lenses!

4. Use fresh solution every time you store your lenses. Never add clean solution to “top off” old solution.

5. Replace your contacts as directed…don’t wear two week contacts for 30 days!  Wearing your contacts past the recommended usage date can cause bacteria and germs to accumulate. The lenses may tear or deteriorate after prolonged use.  When in doubt, throw them out!

6. Keep your contact case clean, rinse with disinfecting contact lens solution and let dry completely!  A dirty contact lens case can be a breeding ground for bacteria. Replace your contact lens case every 3 months.

Why do you need to follow these rules?

Contact lens infections (keratitis) can be painful, and in the worst case scenario, can cause permanent scarring and even blindness. If you have developed bad lens wearing habits, stop now!

 No sleeping in contacts.  No swimming or showering in contacts.  No dirty contact cases. 

Questions?  Dr. Bianca Tang is our contact lens expert.  Let her work with you to find the best lenses and the best fit to give you the vision you’ve been looking for.  Fill out the form to the right to contact our office for an appointment, or call us at 610-628-2022.

Proud of our Eagle Scout!

Congratulations to Jagger

Bolton, Eagle Scout!

 

Jagger Bolton, Mandy’s son, started with scouting at age seven with Troop 58 in Slatington, nine years later, he earned the rank of Eagle Scout.  Jagger’s Eagle Scout project was to rejuvenate the fish pond outside of the Springside Fish Hatchery in Slatington.

In the picture at right, PA State Representative Zachary Mako recognizes Jagger’s achievement with a special commendation from the State of Pennsylvania.  Family and friends were all on hand to congratulate Jagger at his Eagle Scout ceremony.

 

The renovation project took months to complete.  The first step was to  remove all of the fish from the hatchery, transferring them to local creeks. After the fish were relocated, he began work on the fish pond itself.  The project included repair and painting of the fence, beautification of the landscaping and installing a new bench so local residents could enjoy the view.

A project on this scale was not possible without the help of the community.  Jagger acknowledges the generosity of area businesses who donated items or gave discounts for supplies and equipment.

Jagger also wants to thank his friends and family who donated their time and energy.  They persevered through a rainy summer to get it all done.  From spreading mulch to preparing meals for the volunteers, Jagger’s crew made it all possible.

The photos below help to tell the story of a job well done!

Innovative Cornea Care

Corneal Therapy offers Successful Healing

Moran Eye Associates’ Dr. Bianca Tang recently used an innovative treatment to help a patient’s cornea heal faster and more effectively.  This treatment promotes healing using amniotic membranes suspended in a ring that sits on the eye like a contact lens.

The patient had been using prescription drop therapy over a period of months to help with a painful area of corneal thinning, but her eye wasn’t getting better. She was in pain, and and she was having cloudy vision. She was over 80 years old, and had other health issues that caused slower healing.

What did the patient think of the process?

“Dr. Tang recommended a new procedure that cured my cornea erosion issue. It was a stem cell lens that aided healing of the cornea. I now have my sight back in both eyes with no pain. Thank you so much for using this new procedure. It worked like a charm.”

The treatment Dr. Tang recommended was Prokera.  The amniotic membranes in Prokera are safe, promote new cell growth, and prevent the development of scar tissue. The membrane itself dissolves after one week, and the doctor removes the ring following treatment.

Dr. Tang’s response to the results.

“The outcome was even better than I could have imagined. The area of epithelial defect that covered almost a quarter of her cornea was completely resolved. The most rewarding part of this treatment is knowing that the patient was no longer in pain, and that her vision was much improved.”

Studies show that using amniotic membranes:

  • Reduces pain
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Reduces Scar Formation
  • Introduces essential factors for new cell growth

Whether managing disease, trauma, or post-operative care, healing of the ocular surface is essential to patients’ comfort and vision.

At Moran Eye Associates, our doctors offer excellent care that is personalized, innovative and effective. You can depend on us for all of your eye care needs for your entire family.

Eyes are the Windows to your Health

Your annual eye exam offers a look at more than just your vision.

view of dilated eye

You may have heard that the eyes are the windows to your soul, but did you know that they provide a look at your overall health as well.

Your dilated eye is an open window where blood vessels and nerves can be clearly seen. The view through the open pupil is a unique means of detecting health issues including:

  • Diabetes
  • Glaucoma
  • Hardening of the Arteries
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Macular Degeneration

Your eye doctor may be the first to alert you to developing health problems.The American Optometric Society reported that in just one year, over 250,000 patients were diagnosed with diabetes after their optometrists reported concerns. Early diagnosis and treatment are vital for the health and vision of diabetic patients.

Changes or fluctuation in your vision may also be an indicator of a larger health problem.  Report blurred vision to your eye doctor, it may be a sign of increased blood sugar levels and the need for medical treatment.

Uncontrolled diabetes can have severe consequences. Loss of vision due to diabetic retinopathy is a primary concern. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people under the age of 74, so a regular schedule of dilated eye exams are important for diabetic patients. If you know someone who is diabetic,or has a family history of the disease, make sure that they are getting the eye care that they need.

Our goal is to keep you healthy!

Dr. Moran and Dr. Tang not only provide excellent vision care, they are essential partners for your general health and well-being.  If you are overdue for a vision exam, don’t delay. Call us to schedule your appointment, Monday through Friday from 8 am to 4 pm.

 

For a video of a dilated eye exam, click here National Eye Institute Dilated Eye Exam

Complete Eye Care

A patient asked the other day, “Do you do regular eye exams?” 

Of course we do!  At Moran Eye Associates we offer Complete Eye Care, which includes Vision, Medical and Surgical services.

VISION:  We accept VSP & NVA 

  • Routine Eye Exams
  • Contact Lenses: Traditional & Specialty Lenses

MEDICAL: We accept most medical insurances

  • Diabetic Eye Care: Diabetic Retinopathy
  • Glaucoma Care: Medical and Surgical Treatment Options
  • Macular Degeneration
  • Dry Eye Treatment: Diagnostic Services & Thermal Therapy
  • Eye Emergencies
  • Infection/Inflammation
  • Low Vision Services

SURGICAL: Dr. Moran does surgery at the Surgery Center of Allentown, Sightpath LASIK Center in Bethlehem, as well as some procedures in our Delaware Avenue office

  • Cataracts
  • LASIK
  • PRK
  • Laser Floater Removal
  • Glaucoma Eye Surgery
  • Foreign Body Removal
  • Eye Lid Surgery

Please contact our office if you need an appointment for your eye care. Call or text us at 610-628-2022, or send us an email by filling out the form on the right!